Feminism Other Strands of Feminism

Feminism 

Feminism refers to a variety of idea that believe power relationships between men and women are unequal. In addition they view this problem as a social construction rather than a natural situation arising from biological differences between male and female.

Liberal Feminism

There are a number of strands to feminist thought. Liberal feminism works to combat discrimination against female and seeks equality of treatment and equality of opportunity. Measures to secure formal equality appear in equal rights legislation (such as the United Kingdom’s 1970 Equal Pay Act and 1975 Sex Discrimination Act) derive from this perspective.

Radical Feminism

Radical feminism seeks the liberation of women. This focuses not on inequality but, rather, on the system of sexual oppression, termed ‘patriarchy,’ (or ‘rule by men,’). Radical feminists believe that patriarchy is the key power relationship in society and is reproduced in each generation by the family. They believe that sexual equality requires a revolution in cultural and social values and cannot be attained by providing additional legal rights for women within existing social structure. Marxist feminism attributes the oppression of women to the operations of capitalism that gives rise to economic dependent, viewed as the basis of women’s oppression. They assert that only in a communist society would this situation be remedied. Socialist feminism concentrates on the way in which the twin forces of patriarchy and class oppression interact in a capitalist society and place women in a socially subordinate position. Unlike radical feminists, however, they do not view the interests of men and women as being permanently opposed.

Marxist Feminism

Marxist feminism attributes the oppression of women to the operations of capitalism that gives rise to economic dependent, viewed as the basis of women’s oppression. They assert that only in a communist society would this situation be remedied. Socialist feminism concentrates on the way in which the twin forces of patriarchy and class oppression interact in a capitalist society and place women in a socially subordinate position. Unlike radical feminists, however, they do not view the interests of men and women as being permanently opposed.

Postmodernist Feminism

Postmodernist feminism rejects the certainly and objectivity that underlaid the Marxist view of class interests. They do not see all women as being subject to the same processes and believed that different groups encounter different experiences.